Atmospheric EMFs Preview

Well, it’s been quite the day.

Though one I technically took off.

I was actually going to write a post about Volume 2 but as I was editing part of Volume 1 decided I would give readers and visitors a preview.

The section deals with Atmospheric EMFs.

More than a peek into the book it gives an idea of my writing style.

Without further ado – this is the opening of the section – though there is more.

It’s long as it’s a book excerpt.

I believe people will appreciate where I’m coming from.

And as I said – this will give an idea where I’m going – the tools and strategies I use to deal with it.

Enjoy:

Excerpt from Under Siege: Tools and Strategies for Dealing with the Pillars of EMF Sensitivity

Beginning in the spring of 1983, just after relocating to Michigan from Florida, I began suffering horrific migraines.

I’d never had headaches or mirgaines prior to that, outside the pain from the brain bleed that set my life on a new and unanticipated trajectory.

13 at the time, I would lay in bed in my maternal grandmother’s basement, clutching my head and crying.

My mother, brother, and I lived in my grandparents’ basement after my parents separated.

My grandmother observed the migraines started 48 hours prior to a thunderstorm which are prevalent in Michigan and Northern Ohio in the spring and early summer.

Particularly at the end of May and beginning of June.

Irrespective of understanding a connection to thunderstorms, I never found an explanation for the sudden onset of debilitating migraines.

Nor did my neurosurgeion or the British ENT surgeon who had become a friend and integral part of my life.

Nor could I find a way to control the pain.

Not even narcotics administered in the ER.  All they did was make it so I could fall asleep until the weather system moved out.

Right up until I transferred to the West Coast in 2000, I was negatively impacted.

I could count on being a regular visitor to the ER the last weekend in May and/or first weekend in June – thank you thunderstorms.

A Break in the Gloom.

By chance…

To my great fortune, before I relocated West,  I landed in the ER at Providence Novi on a stormy evening when a particularly savvy doctor was on duty.  When I explained the usual cocktail used to  deal with that type of migraine…

That had me clutching my head and crying.

Wait – back up a moment.

To give perspective.

When it came to migraines that landed me in the ER.

1/2 the time I woke in the middle of the night with horrible throbbing pain.

No flashing lights or sounds – just the terrible throbbing at the brain surgery site.

  Since I was in no position to drive and didn’t want to call an ambulance I had to phone someone to take me.

I always felt terrible for waking someone – usually my mom and stepdad – but  I really didn’t think an ambulance was the right thing to do and I was in no condition to drive.

The other 1/2 the time I was either on my way to work or on my way home from work.

Storm systems have no respect for the working woman and their sense of timing blows.

On this particular occasion I’d driven myself to the ER from work.

I remember staring out the window – talking with a colleague at the time and telling him I’d better leave because I could feel the buildup in my head as the clouds approached our office in Southfield.

I almost stopped at the Farmington Hills police station.

The pain was so awful I worried the clamp for the brain bleed had come loose and I was having another brain bleed.  

I literally screamed behind the wheel the pain was so bad.

Damn migraines.

Once in the ER after explaining I had a migraine and being brusquely told – after they decided I wasn’t dying from it – to take a seat, I ended up on the floor curled into a tight ball clutching my head and crying.

Yep – on the oh so hygienic floor.

A kind elderly woman came over, pulled me up, got me into a chair and held my head in her lap while I clutched it and cried.

I was 28.

Your Head Hurts?  Really?

How bad?

Oh, I don’t know – want me to puke down your clean white coat so we can swap stories?

I don’t know if his bedside manner was off or if he just didn’t think a crying adult female anything to worry about but I wasn’t too keen on the doctor’s tone of voice.

And in no condition to do anything but clutch my head and weave – hoping I wouldn’t fall off the gurney – and answer his questions about the severity of the pain.  Clutching my head while crying on the floor of the ER didn’t do it apparently.

Wondering if I was going to throw up – from the crying or the pain I didn’t know – I said “Just give me the Demerol- Vistaril and I’ll call someone to pick me up.”

This is the treatment I was given every other time.  

I’d never before asked for those drugs.  

Not once.

All I knew is that for the previous 7 years of my life – every late May and/or early June I ended up in the ER with a vascular migraine no one could explain the reason for and that’s what they gave me.

Along with something for nausea.

I think they went this route because codeine gave me a boomerang headache.

And also because  once they learned I’d had brain surgery and had a titanium clip in my head?  They ran for the hills.  

Of Note.

I repeatedly consulted with my GP and my neurosurgeon.  I refused any prescription for any narcotics.

hate the way they make me feel.

I generally self-medicated with multiple Excederins only going to the ER if the pain became unbearable.

Try the Experts.

In headaches not neurosurgery.

I had a full workup at the Ann Arbor Headache clinic.

Complete with a consultation with two bright and shiny as a penny neurologists.

The only thing they were able to offer after several days of tests and interviews was that I had – get this – “A chemical imbalance.”

Funny how they couldn’t tell me which chemicals were out of balance.

They wrote a prescription for Pamelor.

I was confused.  It’s an anti-depressant and I wasn’t depressed.

The side effects were so awful – I was a walking zombie – I never took a second dose.

And theoretically I’d gotten the lowest possible dose.

I didn’t remember an entire day at work and that evening while driving home near the Pontiac Silverdome – when I saw a sign for I-75?  The initial thought that went through my head was “Oh, cool, now I can go 75 miles an hour.”

I was on Featherstone?  Hellloooooo

I was very lucky to yank myself into reality.  I called the doctor the next day – after NOT taking another pill and when he asked why I was so determined to never take it again?  I said, “Let’s put it this way.  The medicine negatively impacts my life way more than the migraines do.”

Not to mention I was not depressed.

Damn scary if you ask me.  Can you imagine people on the road with this stuff in their system?  Yikes!

Back to Our Story.

The minute I mentioned the narcotic cocktail?  His eyes narrowed.

Obviously I was flashing a neon sign that read Junkie looking for a fix.

Hey jerkweed?  Look at my record.  Every year between the end of May and the beginning of June – during the height of Michigan thunderstorm activity and only in the Detroit Metro area?  I end up in the ER.  

I literally told him to look up the record in less-than-dulcet tones.

Hey – I didn’t call him an ass!  

Then again he was the one with the pain relief magic pen.

I also invited him to look at my pharmacy record.

No prescriptions.  None.

Nothing.  I took no medication.

Still don’t.

I’d be one hell of a clever junkie to cover my trail that well.

Or maybe it was my suit – coming from work – that made him suspect?

He was unconvinced.

And I was still clutching my head with tears sliding down my cheeks.

I suggested he page and talk with the neurosurgeon who put the clip on my brain bleed in 1979.

Who was probably on rounds at St. Mary’s of Redford hospital, if not in surgery.

Are You Willing?

Not a nice question to ask someone who isn’t a spy but who is experiencing excrutiating pain.  Hm.  Maybe that would be a good recruiting tool…

He asked if I would be willing to try a  non-narcotic.

In otherwords, did I really truly seriously want to do something about the excrutiating pain?

Oh, I don’t know.  Does the sun come up in the morning?

Yes!

I was ecstatic at the thought of a remedy that didn’t necessitate I call someone to drive me home where I would sleep and wake feeling like crap because of the narcotics and their side-effects.

And the pain never went away.  The narcotics just allowed me to sleep until the storm system mosied northeast.

He gave me Imitrex.

A miracle!

I drove myself home and due to a number of circumstances including moving across the country – never found myself in the ER with a migraine again.

To this day!

I hope you’ve enjoyed this excerpt. There’s more to the chapter, more to the book.

Lots of meat in both Volumes 1 & 2.

As I’ve shared in Ignoring the Rules: An Intriguing Approach to Resolving Calcium Toxicity, I figured out a cure for these migraines – caused by atmsopheric pressure drops – a year ago.

The remedy and my thoughts on what was going on are included in that book along with this one.

Stay tuned.

Note: Though I never again had migraines severe enough to land me in the ER until I discovered the Atmospheric EMF migraine cure? I had migraines.

Caused by atmospheric EMFs.

They were just more tolerable.

After the cure? Nada.

Even in the presence of those same Atmospheric EMFs.

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